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A SPECIAL documentary has been made to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Scots ace Colin McRae becoming World Rally Champion.

His victory in his iconic blue Subaru Impreza in the RAC Rally on November 22, 1995, saw him become the first Brit to take the WRC title.

Adding further to rallying history, aged just 27 years and 109 days, Colin was also the sport’s youngest ever World Champion.

His milestone achievement is being marked with a new 30-minute WRC TV documentary – Colin McRae: 25 Years A Champion – in which dad and five-time British champ Jimmy relives fond memories of the 1995 success.

Jimmy also takes the famous Impreza for a spin at Kames circuit, Ayrshire, where Colin made his debut at 17.

Colin’s daughter, Hollie, who was not born when he won the title, also speaks publicly for the first time about the Lanark rally legend who was simply “dad”. 

More than two million fans turned out to roar on their hero at the 1995 WRC finale in Britain’s muddy forests.

Colin fought back from a puncture to claim a 36-second victory and secure the championship by five points from Subaru team-mate and title rival Spaniard Carlos Sainz.

Huge numbers of supporters thronged at Chester Racecourse to celebrate with Colin and co-driver Derek Ringer.

Dad Jimmy recalled: “I can always remember the finish and the doughnuts. The crowds that were there – it was unbelievable.”

Hollie said: “For the first eight years of my life, I didn’t really know Colin McRae the world champion driver, I just knew him as dad. He was loving, he was caring, that’s what still sticks with me.”

Colin carved a reputation as one of the WRC’s most brilliant drivers. Tragically, he died in a helicopter crash in 2007 along with son Johnny and two family friends.

The documentary is being made available by WRC broadcasters worldwide from tomorrow (Friday, November 20, 2020) and can be seen on the WRC+ channel – go to www.wrc.com for information.

This content was originally published here.